Credit: Henington Studios

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by Linda DiProperzio

When you’re planning your wedding, it can be easy to get swept up in the romance of it all. Not to mention that dress shopping, cake tastings and hair trials can be a lot of fun. But it’s important to remember that hiring the professionals that will help make your dream day a reality is a business transaction, and while looking through contracts and reading the fine print isn’t really anyone’s idea of a good time, it is an absolute necessity.

Why would you want a videographer at your wedding?

Hiring a wedding videographer is an important step in the planning process. While photographers can capture your special day with still moments, video allows you to relive all of those memories by watching them play out before your eyes. You get to see loved ones and hear their voices, which will mean the world to you over the years. That’s why finding an experienced and professional videographer is crucial to making sure the job is done right and you don’t have any regrets during or after your wedding day.

The importance of contracts

Once you find the wedding videographer for you (and we can definitely help with that!), having a solid contract is absolutely essential. Even if you are hiring someone you know personally or comes highly-recommended by a family or friend, you still need a written and signed contract. If a vendor balks at the idea of having one, that’s a definite bad sign. After all, a legal document will protect the both of you because it will...

Define the scope of work. You want to be on the same page with your wedding videographer when it comes to your expectations. When booking a professional for your big day, you never want to assume they know what you want. Every detail should be hashed out verbally and then placed into a written contract.

Sets expectations. When your wedding day finally arrives, the last thing you want to do is micromanage one of your vendors to make sure they’re doing what they need to. The contract will spell everything out in detail, including the exact hours the vendor will be at your wedding, what kind of editing will be done afterwards, and of course, how much it will cost you. This legal document ensures that you and your wedding videographer are on the same page, which can save both of you loads of stress in the long run.

Groom kissing bride on wedding day

The Wedding Videographer Contract Template

When you sit down to review your wedding videograher’s contract, make sure the following items are included in the document.

Videographer’s Obligations

  • The date of the event they’re being hired for their services

  • The description of services.

  • Where they will be shooting. For example, do you want them there while getting ready, or just at the church and reception?

  • What time they’re expected to arrive and how many hours they will be working.

  • Number of cameras and names of any assistant videographers or second shooters

  • Substitutions clause, which is the ability to send another professional in the event of an emergency.

  • The video package being chosen, including the type and total time of your finished video

  • Type of equipment and medium to be used

  • Special editing features used

  • Video delivery terms: When the client can expect to view raw footage and when the final product will be delivered to the couple.

  • Basic legal protections (limitation of liability, etc.)

Client’s Obligations

  • Meal clause so that wedding videographer and any assistants are fed at the reception

  • The client might need to obtain permission for the videographer to film at certain locations such as a church, museum, public park or beach, etc.

  • Agreement that the ceremony will start at a certain time and that the videographer is not responsible if the event starts late due to the bride and groom.

  • Payment schedule that the client needs to adhere to.

  • Safe working environment clause: This is especially important during this time, when some vendors want to make sure their staff can wear masks or even that guests will be vaccinated.

Ownership and Creative Rights

  • Who will own the raw footage of the wedding video? Many times, the videographer will include something like, “Raw footage remains the exclusive property of [company]. Unless otherwise specified by the Client, [company] reserves the right to use footage for advertising, display, publication or other purposes without making any payments to Client.”

  • Does the videographer need any special permissions to use certain songs?

Confidentiality

  • Does the wedding videographer have the right to use footage from your event on their social media pages and/or marketing campaigns?

Termination

  • What is the latest a couple can notify the videographer that his services will no longer be needed?

  • If they miss that date, how much of the fee is due?

  • What if the videographer needs to cancel? Will the deposit and any other payments be fully refunded?

Rescheduling & Additional Hours

  • What is the penalty (if any) if a couple needs to reschedule their wedding due to illness, bad weather, etc.? There should also be a Covid-19 clause that protects both vendor and client.

  • If the event is being rescheduled, can the deposit and any other payments be carried over to the new date?

  • What is the fee for overtime? For example, will the videographer be able to work additional hours if the couple requests it, or if the start time is delayed for some reason?

Terms and payments

  • How much is the deposit to secure the videographer’s services?

  • Is the deposit refundable up to a certain due date?

  • When is the remaining balance due?

  • How does the videographer prefer to be paid?

  • Are gratuities included?

Confirmation agreements

Set clear dates on when you will meet to discuss and confirm the final details of your event. You don’t want to be chasing after your videographer the week before your wedding. Instead, have a detailed timeline on when you will call/meet to discuss music selections, specific moments you want captured, when you will see the rough draft and receive the final product.

Acceptance and Signature

And even more important than having the contract in hand: Reading through the document thoroughly! According to Emberwild Films, this is one of the biggest mistakes couples make when hiring any wedding vendor. “If you have a planner, have them review it. If you aren't sure about something, ask questions. Feeling confident about your contract with a vendor is so important.” So once you’ve read through the document from beginning to end, you and your wedding videographer will both sign and date it.

And don’t forget to browse through our collection of professional wedding videos to get an idea of how you want yours to look!

Credit: Henington Studios

by Linda DiProperzio

When you’re planning your wedding, it can be easy to get swept up in the romance of it all. Not to mention that dress shopping, cake tastings and hair trials can be a lot of fun. But it’s important to remember that hiring the professionals that will help make your dream day a reality is a business transaction, and while looking through contracts and reading the fine print isn’t really anyone’s idea of a good time, it is an absolute necessity.

Why would you want a videographer at your wedding?

Hiring a wedding videographer is an important step in the planning process. While photographers can capture your special day with still moments, video allows you to relive all of those memories by watching them play out before your eyes. You get to see loved ones and hear their voices, which will mean the world to you over the years. That’s why finding an experienced and professional videographer is crucial to making sure the job is done right and you don’t have any regrets during or after your wedding day.

The importance of contracts

Once you find the wedding videographer for you (and we can definitely help with that!), having a solid contract is absolutely essential. Even if you are hiring someone you know personally or comes highly-recommended by a family or friend, you still need a written and signed contract. If a vendor balks at the idea of having one, that’s a definite bad sign. After all, a legal document will protect the both of you because it will...

Define the scope of work. You want to be on the same page with your wedding videographer when it comes to your expectations. When booking a professional for your big day, you never want to assume they know what you want. Every detail should be hashed out verbally and then placed into a written contract.

Sets expectations. When your wedding day finally arrives, the last thing you want to do is micromanage one of your vendors to make sure they’re doing what they need to. The contract will spell everything out in detail, including the exact hours the vendor will be at your wedding, what kind of editing will be done afterwards, and of course, how much it will cost you. This legal document ensures that you and your wedding videographer are on the same page, which can save both of you loads of stress in the long run.

Groom kissing bride on wedding day

The Wedding Videographer Contract Template

When you sit down to review your wedding videograher’s contract, make sure the following items are included in the document.

Videographer’s Obligations

  • The date of the event they’re being hired for their services

  • The description of services.

  • Where they will be shooting. For example, do you want them there while getting ready, or just at the church and reception?

  • What time they’re expected to arrive and how many hours they will be working.

  • Number of cameras and names of any assistant videographers or second shooters

  • Substitutions clause, which is the ability to send another professional in the event of an emergency.

  • The video package being chosen, including the type and total time of your finished video

  • Type of equipment and medium to be used

  • Special editing features used

  • Video delivery terms: When the client can expect to view raw footage and when the final product will be delivered to the couple.

  • Basic legal protections (limitation of liability, etc.)

Client’s Obligations

  • Meal clause so that wedding videographer and any assistants are fed at the reception

  • The client might need to obtain permission for the videographer to film at certain locations such as a church, museum, public park or beach, etc.

  • Agreement that the ceremony will start at a certain time and that the videographer is not responsible if the event starts late due to the bride and groom.

  • Payment schedule that the client needs to adhere to.

  • Safe working environment clause: This is especially important during this time, when some vendors want to make sure their staff can wear masks or even that guests will be vaccinated.

Ownership and Creative Rights

  • Who will own the raw footage of the wedding video? Many times, the videographer will include something like, “Raw footage remains the exclusive property of [company]. Unless otherwise specified by the Client, [company] reserves the right to use footage for advertising, display, publication or other purposes without making any payments to Client.”

  • Does the videographer need any special permissions to use certain songs?

Confidentiality

  • Does the wedding videographer have the right to use footage from your event on their social media pages and/or marketing campaigns?

Termination

  • What is the latest a couple can notify the videographer that his services will no longer be needed?

  • If they miss that date, how much of the fee is due?

  • What if the videographer needs to cancel? Will the deposit and any other payments be fully refunded?

Rescheduling & Additional Hours

  • What is the penalty (if any) if a couple needs to reschedule their wedding due to illness, bad weather, etc.? There should also be a Covid-19 clause that protects both vendor and client.

  • If the event is being rescheduled, can the deposit and any other payments be carried over to the new date?

  • What is the fee for overtime? For example, will the videographer be able to work additional hours if the couple requests it, or if the start time is delayed for some reason?

Terms and payments

  • How much is the deposit to secure the videographer’s services?

  • Is the deposit refundable up to a certain due date?

  • When is the remaining balance due?

  • How does the videographer prefer to be paid?

  • Are gratuities included?

Confirmation agreements

Set clear dates on when you will meet to discuss and confirm the final details of your event. You don’t want to be chasing after your videographer the week before your wedding. Instead, have a detailed timeline on when you will call/meet to discuss music selections, specific moments you want captured, when you will see the rough draft and receive the final product.

Acceptance and Signature

And even more important than having the contract in hand: Reading through the document thoroughly! According to Emberwild Films, this is one of the biggest mistakes couples make when hiring any wedding vendor. “If you have a planner, have them review it. If you aren't sure about something, ask questions. Feeling confident about your contract with a vendor is so important.” So once you’ve read through the document from beginning to end, you and your wedding videographer will both sign and date it.

And don’t forget to browse through our collection of professional wedding videos to get an idea of how you want yours to look!

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